Effectiveness of management of the built environment

Component
Summary
Grade
Ineffective Partially effective Effective Very effective
Confidence
In Grade In Trend
Comparability
To previous years

Understanding: General good understanding of many of the pressures affecting the built environment, especially pollution and climate change, and an awareness of issues relating to population growth. The complexity and interrelationships that influence urban footprints are increasingly being understood

Year(s): 
2016
2
Stable
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Somewhat adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Somewhat comparable

Understanding: There is generally a good understanding by the various management entities of issues affecting the built environment. This understanding is improving through initiatives such as the State of Australian cities report and the National Urban Policy; however, understanding is adversely affected by the complexity and interrelationships of a wide range of issues

Year(s): 
2011
3
Improving
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Not assessed

Planning: Planning for the built environment continues, but is complex to coordinate or integrate. Current Australian Government policies point to a renewed focus on cities and integrated planning

Year(s): 
2016
2
Stable
Confidence (in grade): 
Somewhat adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Somewhat adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Somewhat comparable

Planning: Planning is hampered by the diverse range of entities involved and a lack of coordination among them. This lack of coordination has been recognised, and steps are being taken to rectify it. Information deficiencies and conflicting or unclear objectives are also hampering planning

Year(s): 
2011
2
Improving
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Not assessed

Inputs: Although infrastructure investment as an input to the built environment has increased, those inputs also suffer from lack of coordination and integration

Year(s): 
2016
2
Stable
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Somewhat adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Somewhat comparable

Inputs: Inputs are applied in a piecemeal fashion and not always in a manner consistent with plans There is a poor relationship between planning and budgets. Budgets are not always adequate, and there is underinvestment in infrastructure, particularly that relating to public transport. Improved planning should lead to more effective use of resources

Year(s): 
2011
2
Improving
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Limited
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Not assessed

Processes: As with planning, processes relating to built environment management lack cross-sectoral approaches and coordination, particularly with transport and land-use decisions

Year(s): 
2016
2
Deteriorating
Confidence (in grade): 
Somewhat adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Somewhat adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Somewhat comparable

Processes: The lack of coordination across various entities significantly hampers effective processes. Under the Council of Australian Governments initiatives and the National Urban Policy, there is potential for improved alignment between levels of government

Year(s): 
2011
2
Improving
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Not assessed

Outputs and outcomes: The continued sprawling of Australia’s urban areas is evidence that the management of built environment outputs and outcomes is inadequate. Traffic congestion and access to reliable public transport are problematic for some areas. Pollution levels are, however, relatively good, and some aspects of urban environmental efficiency (water, energy, waste recovery) are improving

Year(s): 
2016
2
Stable
Confidence (in grade): 
Somewhat adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Somewhat adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Somewhat comparable

Outputs and outcomes: Partially effective inputs and processes are leading to partially effective outputs and outcomes in terms of the livability and urban environmental efficiency of the built environment, as assessed in Section 2 Although expected improvements in planning and processes should have a positive impact on outputs and outcomes, this may be counteracted by increasing pressures on the built environment, as identified in Section 3

Year(s): 
2011
2
Stable
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Limited
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Not assessed
Coleman S (2016). Built environment: Effectiveness of management of the built environment. In: Australia state of the environment 2016, Australian Government Department of the Environment and Energy, Canberra, https://soe.environment.gov.au/assessment-summary-103-effectiveness-management-built-environment, DOI 10.4226/94/58b65a5037ed8