Effectiveness of climate change management

Component
Summary
Grade
Ineffective Partially effective Effective Very effective
Confidence
In Grade In Trend
Comparability
To previous years

Understanding: Good understanding of broad processes and improving confidence in modelling projections at both the national and regional scales. National greenhouse emissions reporting system is improved

Year(s): 
2016
2
Improving
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Comparable

Understanding: Good understanding of broad processes and improving confidence in modelling projections at both national and regional scales. Extensive support for policy and priority setting at national level through initial Garnaut Climate Change Review (2008) and subsequent review update (2011) and through an improved national greenhouse emissions reporting system

Year(s): 
2011
3
Improving
Confidence (in grade): 
Limited
Confidence (in trend): 
Adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Not assessed

Planning: More ambitious target (26–28% below 2005 levels by 2030) set after the Paris Agreement

Significant changes in strategies and planning during this period, with establishment of several policy tools in 2011 that were removed or repealed by 2013

Strategic planning at state level significantly improved

Year(s): 
2016
3
Stable
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Comparable

Planning: Australian Government has established a broad (‘three-pillars’) strategy underpinned by a legislated 20% Renewable Energy Target and Energy Efficiency Strategy. In July 2011, the government released a plan to establish a price on carbon and encourage least-cost abatement measures. Legislation to give effect to this is expected to be introduced to parliament in the latter half of 2011. A National Adaptation Framework was adopted by COAG in 2007. Level of strategic planning to mitigate and adapt to climate change varies considerably from state to state (e.g. in relation to adaptation to potential impacts of sea level rise)

Year(s): 
2011
2
Improving
Confidence (in grade): 
Limited
Confidence (in trend): 
Limited
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Not assessed

Inputs: Around $13.5 billion committed to climate change initiatives by the Australian Government

Funds available to support climate science at both national and state levels have been significantly reduced

Resources applied by states and territories to mitigation and adaptation programs have been significantly reduced.

Year(s): 
2016
3
Stable
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Comparable

Inputs: Around $15 billion committed to climate change initiatives by the Australian Government. Significant funds are available to support climate science at both national and state levels. Significant resources are also being applied by states and territories to mitigation and adaptation programs

Year(s): 
2011
2
Improving
Confidence (in grade): 
Limited
Confidence (in trend): 
Adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Not assessed

 

Processs: Governance remains complex, with 3 tiers of government involved

Coordination of national, and state and territory programs under Council of Australian Governments actions have progressed (e.g. NEPP), and coordination between state and local governments has improved

Year(s): 
2016
3
Improving
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Comparable

Processes: Governance is complex, with three tiers of government needing to be involved. Coordination of federal and state and territory programs has been improved via COAG actions

Year(s): 
2011
2
Improving
Confidence (in grade): 
Limited
Confidence (in trend): 
Limited
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Not assessed

Outputs and outcomes: Current and projected levels of success of national, and state and territory abatement programs suggest targets will be achieved

Some states have achieved targets already. Australia appears on track to achieve the national 2020 target of a 5% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions below 2000 levels, although there is some debate about this

Methodologies used to project attainment of targets appear to be consistent with international guidelines adopted by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

Year(s): 
2016
3
Unclear
Confidence (in grade): 
Adequate
Confidence (in trend): 
Adequate
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Comparable

Outputs and outcomes: Current and projected levels of success of federal and state and territory abatement programs are limited. To achieve the national 2020 target of a 5% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions below 2000 levels, abatement measures will need to be greatly increased

Year(s): 
2011
1
Unclear
Confidence (in grade): 
Limited
Confidence (in trend): 
Limited
Comparability (to previous reports): 
Not assessed
Keywood MD, Emmerson KM, Hibberd MF (2016). Climate: Effectiveness of climate change management. In: Australia state of the environment 2016, Australian Government Department of the Environment and Energy, Canberra, https://soe.environment.gov.au/assessment-summary-32-effectiveness-climate-change-management, DOI 10.4226/94/58b65c70bc372