Box BIO14 The Vale of Belvoir

The Vale of Belvoir property is an example of a private protected area, which was purchased by the Tasmanian Land Conservancy in 2008 to protect 476 hectares of montane grassland, wetlands and rainforest in Tasmania’s Central Highlands. It is one of Australia’s best examples of rare and endangered highland grasslands. It also contains unusual karst geology, and important cultural, historical and aesthetic values.

In 2010, a statutory perpetual conservation covenant was registered on the land title under the Tasmanian Nature Conservation Act 2002, which helps protect 6 nationally threatened flora and fauna species (paper daisy—Leucochrysum albicans, endangered; Tasmanian devil—Sarcophilus harrisii, endangered; spotted-tailed quoll—Dasyurus maculatus, vulnerable; eastern quoll—D. viverrinus, vulnerable; masked owl—Tyto novaehollandiae castanops, vulnerable; and ptunarra brown butterfly—Oreixenica ptunarra, endangered), and 1 nationally threatened vegetation community (alpine sphagnum bogs and associated fens). It also protects 3 geoconservation sites of significance, including the nationally significant Vale of Belvoir Sub-alpine Karstland, the Central Highlands Cainozoic Glacial Area and the globally significant Central Plateau Terrain.

Some 95 scientific monitoring sites have been installed across the reserve to inform management, and the national Bush Blitz program has helped identify many species from lesser known taxonomic groups, including 6  new species.

Two photos of the Tasmanian Land Conservancy Vale of Belvoir property, the left shows people working, and the right shows a field of yellow wildflowers.

Two photos of the Tasmanian Land Conservancy Vale of Belvoir property, the left shows people working, and the right shows a field of yellow wildflowers.

The Tasmanian Land Conservancy Vale property Belvoir

Photos: © Tasmanian Land Conservancy

Cresswell ID, Murphy H (2016). Biodiversity: Box BIO14 The Vale of Belvoir. In: Australia state of the environment 2016, Australian Government Department of the Environment and Energy, Canberra, https://soe.environment.gov.au/case-study/biodiversity/box-bio14-vale-belvoir, DOI 10.4226/94/58b65ac828812